Congressman Sam Farr hosts a monthly Congressional briefing series called Latin America on the Rise, which brings in a diverse array of perspectives to highlight emerging and emergent issues in the Western Hemisphere. Prior panelists include Roberta Jacobson, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Department of State; António Guterres, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Maura O’Neil, Chief Innovation Officer, USAID; and Ambassador Carmen Lomellin, US Permanent Representative to the Organization of American States.

 

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Upcoming Briefing:

The State of Cartels in Latin America

 
10:00-11:00 am
Friday, February 13th
Congressional Meeting Room South
Capitol Visitors Center
 
The impact of cartels reverberates across Latin America.
 
In Mexico, some 100,000 deaths were attributed to drug-related violence over the last eight years;
 
  • Bolivia remains one of the three largest cocaine producing countries in the world; and 
     
  • In Guatemala, cartels are “able to move drugs, precursor chemicals and bulk cash with little difficulty,” (State Department).
     
  • Cartels have ramped up trafficking strategies, including working within Colombia on drug production and modernizing maritime transit tactics. At the same time, there is a growing domestic market in Latin America: 20% of cocaine produced in Colombia is sold in-country and drug use in Mexico -  while still below the US -  increased 87% from 2002-2011.
 
Please join Congressman Farr at 10:00 am, Friday, February 13th to discuss the state of cartels in Latin America and what the future could hold for cartel influence in the hemisph
 
Panelists
 
Adam Isacson
Senior Associate for Regional Security Policy
Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)
 
Dr. Maria Velez de Berliner
President
Latin Intelligence Corporation
 
 
Moderator
 
June S. Beittel
Analyst in Latin American Affairs
Congressional Research Service